Representing yourself at an Asylum and Immigration Tribunal – Part 1

Representing yourself at an Asylum and Immigration Tribunal – Part 1

If your immigration application has been refused by the Home Office, your next step could be to attend an Immigration Tribunal to appeal the decision and explain your case. Going to court in any circumstance can be a daunting experience. So why then would you want to represent yourself at your own Immigration Tribunal? Well one of the main reasons will probably be costs; everyone knows that instructing a lawyer to represent you is likely to be costly. Immigration lawyers’ fees can vary significantly, but unfortunately this tends to be an indication of their success rate, with the best lawyers charging more than lawyers who are not so successful, due to inexperience, high workload or lack of proper training.

So, what then makes a successful lawyer in Immigration and Asylum proceedings and how can you achieve this for yourself?

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Representing yourself at an Asylum and Immigration Tribunal – Part 2

You don’t need to be a solicitor to present your own appeal in a clear and forthright manner. What you really need is a thorough understanding of your full case. What does that mean? It means you need to understand all the reasons why your application was refused, and then you must provide evidence to address all of the reasons for refusal. Knowing exactly what you are trying to prove with specific evidence will help you to present your case in a clear and well-organised manner.

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Make a successful immigration application yourself and save hundreds of Pounds.

Make a successful immigration application yourself and save hundreds of Pounds.

There are three main reasons why making your immigration application yourself could be the best choice for you.

First, it is extremely important that you provide the Home Office with as much information about your personal circumstances as possible, and clearly no one knows your personal circumstances better than you. Even after telling your solicitor all about your case, they could still be unlikely to give a full and detailed account of your immigration history as well as you would. The more information you provide about your personal circumstances, the easier it will be for the Home Office to make the right decision about your case.

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Are the Tier 4 students you employ classed as Migrant Workers?

Yes! Did you know that students, even with permission to work a limited number of hours a week in the UK, can still be classed as migrant workers? The UK Visa and Immigration treat students the same as any other migrant workers.

So what does that mean for those of you who regularly employ students on a casual basis, even under zero hours contracts? Well it means you should have in place the correct human resources and recruitment systems to meet and maintain your responsibilities as an employer of migrant workers.

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Immigration News03 Employers

Status of EU citizens in the UK: what you need to know.   Home Office Guidance   – Published;26 June 2017 Newsletter –  Information for European Union citizens living in the UK.   Since the result of the referendum last summer, the UK government has made it absolutely clear how important it is that we secure, as early as possible, both…

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